Piercing Care

FAQ

What kinds of tattoo designs can I choose from?

When it comes to today’s tattoo designs, the choices are almost endless! Your first step is to browse some web sites – just do a Google search for “misterinktattoo.com”. Chances are, you’ll be overwhelmed by the sheer variety – there’s tribal tattoos, Celtic tattoos, traditional ‘tattoo parlor’ designs, biker tattoos, Japanese tattoos, Chinese tattoos … the possibilities are endless.

Think about what inspired you to want a tattoo in the first place. Chances are, you saw a tattoo you liked on someone else – what style was it? What did you like about it? you also can print a photo and mister ink will make it for you !

If you know someone who has a tattoo,you can olso cheak our Tattoo Gallery for designs that you can look through. You don’t have to make an appointment for this – just come in and ask to look at a book of designs and we the to help you to creat your new Tattoo its for FREE (12691 NW 42nd Ave, Opa-locka, FL 33054).

How much does it hurt to get a tattoo?

When it comes right down to it, that’s what most people really want to know! Actually, getting a tattoo is not very painful nowadays because modern tattoo equipment is such that the needles go in and out of your skin very quickly. You’ll be completely able to carry on a normal conversation while getting your tattoo.

Of course, depending on your tattoo designs and location, the amount of discomfort can vary to some degree. Generally speaking, tattooing over bone – where there’s little flesh or fat – hurts a bit more. So getting a tattoo on the fleshy part of your arm probably won’t hurt much at all, but directly over your ankle bone or collar bone may be more painful – though still quite bearable.

Tattoo designs can also make a difference with regard to how it feels. Tattooing lines produces a different sensation from ‘filling in’, or tattooing blocks of color. Interestingly, though, there’s quite a lot of disagreement over which hurts more! It seems to be a subjective reaction – some people find the lines more comfortable than the filling in, while others say just the opposite. Suffice it to say that neither is really all that painful.

Is it safe to get a tattoo?

If you go to a professional tattoo shop where the proper tattoo equipment is used, getting a tattoo is very safe. Decades ago there was concern about getting hepatitis C from tattoos, but this is something all professionals are very conscious of nowadays. If new needles are used for each and every customer, there is no chance of contracting a blood-borne disease. Most tattoo artists will be glad to set your mind at rest by showing you the unopened package of needles they will be using before the tattooing begins. After your tattoo is finished, they should dispose of the needles. Ask about safety policies such as these before you select a tattoo shop.

How much does it cost?

Tattoo prices vary according to the size and tattoo designs. Of course, a larger and more complex design will cost more than a smaller, simpler one – that stands to reason. To give you an idea, relatively simple tattoo designs that are quite small (about the size of a silver dollar) will usually cost about $70 or $80. Prices vary though, so the best thing to do is to ask. Bring your design – or just describe it – and most tattoo shops will be able to quote you a price right then and there.

I’ve heard that tattoos don’t look so good once you start to age. Is that true? Are there any places where you should avoid getting a tattoo?

It’s true that skin and flesh may sag in some places as you age, but that doesn’t necessarily mean your tattoo will look bad. Just use your common sense. You know roughly where skin tends to sag as you get older, so don’t get a large tattoo in those areas. A small one is usually okay, though, and there are several places where you can get a tattoo that won’t change substantially over the years – such as your ankle, shoulder or upper arm. These are the most popular tattoo locations at any rate. Keep in mind that any tattoo may fade over time though, and you may need to get it re-inked. Colors tend to fade faster than black.

What can I do if I’m dissatisfied with a tattoo?

Unfortunately, your options are limited. Depending on the tattoo design, it’s possible that it can be added to and that might make the appearance of the tattoo more to your liking. Or you can look at tattoo removal methods – they are rather costly, but the results tend to be much better than they used to be.

The key, however, is to make sure that you’re getting the tattoo you want before the inking process actually starts. That’s why the tattoo artist will apply an inked stencil to the surface of your skin before he starts tattooing – you’ll get to see what the tattoo will look like and to adjust the positioning of it if you need to. The artist will then use the stencil lines as a guide.

How old do I have to be to get a tattoo?

Usually eighteen, though this can vary from place to place. Some tattoo shops are more diligent than others about asking for I.D., so some people do succeed in getting a tattoo before they’re eighteen. It’s usually not a good idea, though. The older you are when you get a tattoo, the less likely you’ll be to regret it later on!

When should I not get a tattoo?

You shouldn’t get a tattoo if you’re drunk or high (and most tattoo shops have a policy in place about this; they’ll refuse to tattoo anyone who appears to be drunk or high or as a sign in one shop says, “just plain stupid”). The other reason for not getting a tattoo is if you’re not sure. Wait until you do feel sure or just don’t get one. This is not a good thing to feel ambiguous about. There are no specific medical considerations, but use your common sense. If you’re sick, wait till you get better.

Will having a tattoo make it harder for me to get a good job?

If you’re worried, why not get the tattoo in a place where office clothes will cover it? For men at any rate, that still leaves a lot of choices. Even if you can’t keep it covered though, in this day and age it probably won’t matter. Tattoos are a lot more socially acceptable than they ever before and in most workplaces you are judged on the basis of your ability. There are exceptions, of course; there are tattoos that are so prominent and controversial in terms of their appearance or content that they may cause problems for you, just as there are workplaces which are exceptionally conservative. You need to make sure that all aspects of your appearance fit your objectives, and that includes tattoos. But having a tattoo or two certainly won’t preclude you from being gainfully employed – not in this day and age!

Can I give myself a tattoo at home, or have my friend give me one?

Technically it may be possible, but certainly not advisable. You should have your tattoos professionally done – otherwise you’re just asking for trouble in the form of an infection or slower healing time. Do-it-yourself tattoos hurt a lot more and they seldom turn out as well as professional tattoos. All in all, it’s definitely not worth it!

I’ve heard that getting tattoos can be addictive. Is that true?

It isn’t true in the sense of a real addiction, but it is a fact that people who already have one tattoo are more likely to get another one … or so. It is possible to get ‘hooked’ on the excitement of getting a tattoo, just as some people get ‘hooked’ on shopping, but that’s not a real addiction. Most people who end up with multiple tattoos do so simply because they like them.

Tattoo Gallery

The History Of Tattoos

There are few art forms that have been around for as long as tattooing – in fact, some anthropologists claim that the history of tattoos may date back as long as 15,000 years! Certainly, we know that many of the ancient civilizations, including the Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans, used tattooing techniques.

It is believed that tattoos were first started by accident. A cut or small wound may have been rubbed by a hand that was dirty with soot, leaving behind a permanent mark…

There are mentions of tattooing in the Bible, indicating that it was practiced among the ancient peoples of the Middle East as well. However, the remarkable thing about the history of tattoos is how widespread this tradition was. Apparently, decorating the body in this permanent way is an almost universal impulse spread over a lot of different cultures.Throughout history, tattoos have been used as:

Timeline

It’s hard to say when exactly the art of tattooing started because tattoo history is not well recorded or known. Around 2000 BCE tattooing had a cultural significance in places as diverse as China, Crete and Arabia

3,300 BC – Tattoos were possibly used to treat arthritis, as well as for ornamentation. A corpse dating from this era (the bronze age) was discovered in 1991. “Otzi the ice man” bore 58 tattoos, including a cross on the inside of his left knee, 6 straight lines above the kidneys and several parallel lines on his ankles. It’s impossible to believe that the one tattooed man in the culture would be so perfectly preserved. Scientists agree that the entire society was probably i 3,000 BC – Japanese clay figurines depict people with painted faces or other tattoos.

2800 BC – Tattoo history clearly shows that Egyptians were regularly inked. They spread the art form from ancient Greece into China.

1100 BC – Writings from the Kurdish Arab travel writer Ahmad Ibn Fadlan, describe a meeting with Vikings. He described them as being rude, disgusting, and “covered with pictures”.

400 BC – Tattoos are still used for decoration and are believed to hold some magical significance for the pazyryk culture (Siberia). In 1948 several mummies found from this era are sporting tattoos of animals, including griffins and monsters. These tattoos also may have reflected the individual’s status in the society.

297 AD – An actual written record of tattooing is made in Japan.

1700’s – A law is passed in Japan saying that only royalty can wear ornate clothing. The middle class let their opinions be known by clothing themselves in full-body tattoos (to this day, a full-body tattoo is known as a Japanese Suit.)

1700’s – French soldiers returning from the South Pacific sport tattoos.

1846 – The first permanent tattoo shop opened in New York City. No discrimination here, they proudly tattooed both Confederate and Union Soldiers.

1861 – Tattooing receives published medical attention when the French surgeon, Maurice Berchon, publishes a study on the medical complications associated with it. Tattooing is banned within the French Army.

1862 – Royalty gets tattooed when the Prince of Wales, the future King Edward VII, has a Jerusalem cross placed on his arm.

1862 – A new fad is set as many British aristocrats follow in his footsteps and get tattooed.

1891 – The electric tattooing machine was invented by Samuel O’Reilly. The same technology is used today, evidence that some things really never change.

1961 – Hepatitis B reminds the world of what Maurice Berchon knew – tattooing has its pitfalls. Tattoo parlors are banned in New York City due to the outbreak.

Cultures around the World

Ancient Egypt Mummies of women have been found with dots distributed over their bellies and around the tops of the thighs. It is likely that these were done with the intent of protecting the unborn child, both in the womb and during the birth.

Polynesia; Tattoos play a major role in Polynesian culture. What is known of their tattoo history has been handed down from one generation to the next through legends, songs and ceremonies. Polynesian tattoo art is thought to be the most detailed in the world, created by the most talented and skilled artists.

Japan ;Tattooing was enjoyed for the sake of tattooing, much like modern day society. While there were some magical attributes to it, it was done largely for decoration. The Japanese artists were considered masters because they could work wonders with colors and creative patterns, think about the Japanese suit.

 North America ;Tattooing is nothing new to the New World. Native Americans have a long history of tattoo art. Outstanding warriors used the tattoos to clearly show their status. Women were tattooed to show their married status and group identity.

 Borneo; Borneo now plays an important role in the history of tattoos. Many tribes in this part of Indonesia have had very limited contact with the modern world, and so the old ways of tattooing are still used. The tattoo art of Borneo has set the standard for what people today call a “tribal” tattoo.

 Europe; And, while we may not be accustomed to thinking of Europeans in terms of ‘tribes’, it was not too long ago when the people of Europe were just that – think of the Britons, the Normans, the Goths, the Celts – and yes, most of these people practiced tattooing as well! However, following the Dark Ages in Europe, the people organized themselves into nations and tattooing became an all-but-forgotten art, only to be rediscovered during the course of eighteenth-century exploration..

 

Tattoos and Criminality

The marking of criminals with tattoos is a concept that we could call the ‘dark side’ of tattoo history – the fact that body tattooing has been used, in certain times in history, to indicate an inferior status. This is relatively unusual and

The ‘New’ Tattoo Art

In the early 1700s, the history of tattoos took a new twist. Captain Cook visited the South Pacific Islands and brought back with him an intricately tattooed young girl named Onai. Instantly, tattoo designs became a hit, and many members of the nobility obtained discreet, private tattoo art. For a brief time, tattooing – then a costly, lengthy procedure – became a status symbol.

This all changed with the introduction of the first electric tattoo needle in 1891. Suddenly, everyone who wanted a tattoo could have one, and the result was that it came to be considered vulgar. This is, after all, a fairly typical human reaction – when something is hard to get, we tend to want it more! in most cultures, tattoo art is a symbol of status or accomplishment. After that, tattoo art went underground, so to speak. A facility in New York’s Chatham Square brought the practice to the modern American public, but tattooing was considered somewhat disreputable until it made a dramatic comeback a few decades ago. As tattoo designs and safety techniques improved, and several prominent celebrities began to sport tattoos, they became desirable once again. Towards the end of the 1800s criminals in America and even normal citizens were tattooed with a code for identification purposes. There are currently more than 39 million Americans sporting tattoos. In the mid-twentieth century, tattoos were for criminals, “bad boys”, and sailors. People went to the circus to see the “Tattooed man” working in the sideshow. Today, tattoos are worn by CEO’s as well as sailors, good girls and bad boys alike. Once thought of as a way to show you were tough, they’re now more accepted, appreciated and enjoyed.

 

Tattoo Care

Dear customer or membership friend in Mister Ink Tattoo When  you’re getting your first tattoo or adding to your collection, you probably recognize that a tattoo is an investment. Mister ink tattoo Proper care of a new tattoo is vital to keeping that investment looking good for the long-term. Good tattoo care is vital and just as important as choosing your design. This goes for tattoo art as well as cosmetic tattoos.

Nowadays, as long as you Mister Ink Tattoo professional facility, getting a tattoo poses very little health risk. The horror stories you may have heard about tattoo allergies or infections belong mainly in the past. That doesn’t mean you don’t have to be careful though – for maximum enjoyment and minimum grief, you need to follow certain tattoo aftercare instructions.

Mister ink Tattoo Learn how to care for a (new) tattoo:

Phase One: Cover Up

You’re all finished up and ready to show the world your new ink, but you’ll have to wait just a little while. Your tattoo artist in Mister Ink Tattoo is going to cover that new tattoo, most likely with a thin gauze and bandage, to keep the area sterile and to aid in the healing process. Head home and relax a little. You can remove the covering after a few hours, per Mister Ink Tattoo instructions.

If your not a customer or member of Mister Ink Tattoo One exception to this rule:

” if your tattoo artist covered your tattoo with a plastic wrap, remove it as soon as you get home. Plastic wrap is bad for your tattoo.”

New tattoo care is mainly a matter of keeping the tattoo protected. While your skin is healing, make sure that there is nothing rubbing against the tattoo. Depending on where your tattoo is, this may or may not be a problem. For example, if you have a new tattoo on your ankle, you might need to avoid wearing socks while it heals. For a tattoo on your lower back, make sure that the waistband of your pants is loose enough so that it doesn’t rub.

Phase Two: Keep It Clean

Wash your hands before removing the bandaging, and every time you touch your tattoo: this will greatly reduce the possibility of infection.  Gently wash your tattoo:Use a mild mild soap.

  • Don’t use a washcloth or anything abrasive.
  • Splash the water onto your tattoo rather than putting it under running water straight from the tap.
  • Be sure to remove all traces of blood.
  • Pat dry with a paper towel or soft cloth.
  • After washing, apply a thin layer of an anti-bacterial ointment. You can apply this ointment several times per day, especially if your skin feels dry or tight. Keeping the skin moist and supple will help to minimize scabbing or peeling, thus helping maintain strong color retention.
  • Do not use alcohol or peroxide as these will dry your skin out and right now, moist is good.
  • Continue washing your tattoo in this manner two to three times a day for the first week (more frequently if it’s on your ankle or wrist, as these areas is more easily soiled).

Your normal daily shower is fine but otherwise limits your tattoo’s exposure to water. No swimming, no hot tubing, no soaking in the bath. Chlorine can fade the colors of your tattoo, not to mention the added bonus of even “fresh” water potentially introducing bacteria into your skin, leading to infection.

 Warning!

no tanning! Excessive exposure to sunlight (or to the UV rays in a tanning salon) can fade the colors of the ink. If you do go out in the sun, keep your tattoo covered. Newly tattooed skin is too sensitive to be exposed to the summer sun unless it is protected, and sun exposure can also cause tattoos to fade before their time.

Good tattoo care means putting your tattoo’s needs first, at least for a few weeks.

Phase Three: The Oozing

Let’s face it. You’ve just poked your skin with needles, many times over. Your body is going to react in a perfectly logical fashion by bleeding. In the first days after getting your tattoo, there will a small amount of blood and other delightful bodily fluids seeping from the affected area. This is normal and manageable with good tattoo care.

Ink may also ooze from the tattoo for the first few days. Again, normal. Wear loose fitting clothing that you don’t mind getting ink on. Overnight, put an old towel down to avoid getting ink or blood on your bed linens while you sleep

Phase Four: Stay Supple

Three to four days into your tattoo aftercare program, discontinue the anti-bacterial ointment and begin using lotion. Lotions that are fragrance free and dye free are your best bet (Lubriderm for example). Even if purchasing a lotion recommended by Mister Ink Tattoo, check the ingredients for anything you might be allergic to, like lanolin. There are commercial products designed specifically for tattoo aftercare , but check the ingredients list and consult with Mister Ink tattoo artist before purchasing them.

Apply the lotion after washing your tattoo, or anytime your skin feels dry or tight. Again, keeping the skin supple will help reduce scabbing and peeling . Don’t forget to wash your hands before touching your tattoo to prevent infection.
Your tattoo may itch as it heals but resist the urge to scratch. Lightly slap your skin, or apply some more lotion to alleviate the itching.

 Warning!

put down the petroleum jelly. Just walk away. Unless you want to fade the color in your new piece of body art, in which case, have at it. In general, don’t use products that are greasy or will clog your pores.

 

 

Prevent Tattoo Infection

The risk of infection from a tattoo is nowhere near as high as it used to be, because the proper precautions are taken. Mainly this means that your skin will be sterilized before the tattooing starts, and most importantly, Mister Ink Tattoo provide for all our customers  a new needle (not a ‘cleaned’ or ‘sanitized’ one) will be used. In this day and age, any professional will be well aware of these precautions, so you probably have nothing to worry about.

Still, an essential part of tattoo aftercare is checking for infection. Signs of infection include red, inflamed, puffy looking skin and tenderness. A tattoo that is healing properly should not be tender to the touch after the first couple of days. If it seems to be getting more sensitive rather than less, or if there are any other signs of infection, it may be time to get it checked by a health professional

or call us (786)357-7382  to get a free checked by our location .  .

 Let’s recap the tattoo home care basics:

  • Cleanliness is important for the prevention of infection  : always wash up before touching your tattoo.
  • A little blood or ink seepage is normal.
  • Wash your tattoo 2-3 times per day for one week.
  • Apply an anti-bacterial ointment after cleansing for 3-4 days.
  • Apply lotion after cleansing after the 4th day.
  • Stay out of the pool, away from the beach, and off that tanning bed for two weeks .

 

Most of all, seek the advice of MISTER INK TATTOO. Chances are he has had a little personal experience with tattoo aftercare, and can give you specific advice on how to care for your own new tattoo. Dealing with a new tattoo isn’t difficult – it just requires a little effort from your side. Taking care of a tattoo will ensure that your ink is not a health risk, and that it will heal quickly. Following these tattoo care instructions can ensure a long-lasting and beautiful form of self-expression.

For more question call us :  (786)357-7382 or email us : info@misterinktattoo.com

 

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welcome to Mister Ink Tattoo & Piercing Official website tattoo care

Thinking about getting a Tattoo or Piercing? You’re on the right spot !!!

we are located in Opa Locka Hialeah Flea Market, 12705 N.W. 42nd Avenue, Miami, FL 33054 (yellow Building)

Mister ink is here to help you with his knowledge and experience in getting your new  Tattoo or  Piercing  in Mister Ink Tattoo shop.

here you can learn all about Tattoos and Body Piercing and find a lots of free tattoo designs idea .

Mister ink official  website create and design to helps you to find inspiration for your next design. It also helps you research the tattoo designs you might have in mind.

We have a look at all major aspects of tattoo art, and lots of tattoo pictures can be found here.

Read articles about your particular tattoo idea thoroughly, so you can be sure that the design you are getting doesn’t have a meaning you are not comfortable with.

Getting a tattoo is more than browsing through some tattoo flash.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tribal tattoos

were hip and trendy in the 90s, but then everybody started getting one and it became a bit ordinary. That doesn’t mean a well-done tribal tattoo can’t be great-looking.

 tattoo designs

come in numerous different forms, like butterflies, the sun, the moon, bears, claws, star tattoos and a lot of abstract art.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FAQ TATTOO

Q : What kinds of tattoo designs can I choose from?

When it comes to today’s tattoo designs, the choices are almost endless! Your first step is to browse some web sites – just do a Google search for “misterinktattoo.com”. Chances are, you’ll be overwhelmed by the sheer variety – there’s tribal tattoos, Celtic tattoos, traditional ‘tattoo parlor’ designs, biker tattoos, Japanese tattoos, Chinese tattoos … the possibilities are endless.

Think about what inspired you to want a tattoo in the first place. Chances are, you saw a tattoo you liked on someone else – what style was it? What did you like about it? you also can print a photo and mister ink will make it for you !

If you know someone who has a tattoo,you can olso cheak our Tattoo Gallery for designs that you can look through. You don’t have to make an appointment for this – just come in and ask to look at a book of designs and we the to help you to creat your new Tattoo its for FREE (12691 NW 42nd Ave, Opa-locka, FL 33054).

Q: How much does it hurt to get a tattoo?

When it comes right down to it, that’s what most people really want to know! Actually, getting a tattoo is not very painful nowadays because modern tattoo equipment is such that the needles go in and out of your skin very quickly. You’ll be completely able to carry on a normal conversation while getting your tattoo.

Of course, depending on your tattoo designs and location, the amount of discomfort can vary to some degree. Generally speaking, tattooing over bone – where there’s little flesh or fat – hurts a bit more. So getting a tattoo on the fleshy part of your arm probably won’t hurt much at all, but directly over your ankle bone or collar bone may be more painful – though still quite bearable.

Tattoo designs can also make a difference with regard to how it feels. Tattooing lines produces a different sensation from ‘filling in’, or tattooing blocks of color. Interestingly, though, there’s quite a lot of disagreement over which hurts more! It seems to be a subjective reaction – some people find the lines more comfortable than the filling in, while others say just the opposite. Suffice it to say that neither is really all that painful.

Q: Is it safe to get a tattoo?

If you go to a professional tattoo shop where the proper tattoo equipment is used, getting a tattoo is very safe. Decades ago there was concern about getting hepatitis C from tattoos, but this is something all professionals are very conscious of nowadays. If new needles are used for each and every customer, there is no chance of contracting a blood-borne disease. Most tattoo artists will be glad to set your mind at rest by showing you the unopened package of needles they will be using before the tattooing begins. After your tattoo is finished, they should dispose of the needles. Ask about safety policies such as these before you select a tattoo shop.

Q: How much does it cost?

Tattoo prices vary according to the size and tattoo designs. Of course, a larger and more complex design will cost more than a smaller, simpler one – that stands to reason. To give you an idea, relatively simple tattoo designs that are quite small (about the size of a silver dollar) will usually cost about $40 or $60. Prices vary though, so the best thing to do is to ask. Bring your design – or just describe it – and we will be able to quote you a price right then and there.

Q: I’ve heard that tattoos don’t look so good once you start to age. Is that true? Are there any places where you should avoid getting a tattoo?

It’s true that skin and flesh may sag in some places as you age, but that doesn’t necessarily mean your tattoo will look bad. Just use your common sense. You know roughly where skin tends to sag as you get older, so don’t get a large tattoo in those areas. A small one is usually okay, though, and there are several places where you can get a tattoo that won’t change substantially over the years – such as your ankle, shoulder or upper arm. These are the most popular tattoo locations at any rate. Keep in mind that any tattoo may fade over time though, and you may need to get it re-inked. Colors tend to fade faster than black.

Q: What can I do if I’m dissatisfied with a tattoo?

Unfortunately, your options are limited. Depending on the tattoo design, it’s possible that it can be added to and that might make the appearance of the tattoo more to your liking. Or you can look at tattoo removal methods – they are rather costly, but the results tend to be much better than they used to be.

The key, however, is to make sure that you’re getting the tattoo you want before the inking process actually starts. That’s why the tattoo artist will apply an inked stencil to the surface of your skin before he starts tattooing – you’ll get to see what the tattoo will look like and to adjust the positioning of it if you need to. The artist will then use the stencil lines as a guide.

Q: How old do I have to be to get a tattoo?

Usually eighteen, though this can vary from place to place. Some tattoo shops are more diligent than others about asking for I.D., so some people do succeed in getting a tattoo before they’re eighteen. It’s usually not a good idea, though. The older you are when you get a tattoo, the less likely you’ll be to regret it later on!

Q: When should I not get a tattoo?

You shouldn’t get a tattoo if you’re drunk or high (and most tattoo shops have a policy in place about this; they’ll refuse to tattoo anyone who appears to be drunk or high or as a sign in one shop says, “just plain stupid”). The other reason for not getting a tattoo is if you’re not sure. Wait until you do feel sure or just don’t get one. This is not a good thing to feel ambiguous about. There are no specific medical considerations, but use your common sense. If you’re sick, wait till you get better.

Q: Will having a tattoo make it harder for me to get a good job?

If you’re worried, why not get the tattoo in a place where office clothes will cover it? For men at any rate, that still leaves a lot of choices. Even if you can’t keep it covered though, in this day and age it probably won’t matter. Tattoos are a lot more socially acceptable than they ever before and in most workplaces you are judged on the basis of your ability. There are exceptions, of course; there are tattoos that are so prominent and controversial in terms of their appearance or content that they may cause problems for you, just as there are workplaces which are exceptionally conservative. You need to make sure that all aspects of your appearance fit your objectives, and that includes tattoos. But having a tattoo or two certainly won’t preclude you from being gainfully employed – not in this day and age!

Q: Can I give myself a tattoo at home, or have my friend give me one?

Technically it may be possible, but certainly not advisable. You should have your tattoos professionally done – otherwise you’re just asking for trouble in the form of an infection or slower healing time. Do-it-yourself tattoos hurt a lot more and they seldom turn out as well as professional tattoos. All in all, it’s definitely not worth it!

Q: I’ve heard that getting tattoos can be addictive. Is that true?

It isn’t true in the sense of a real addiction, but it is a fact that people who already have one tattoo are more likely to get another one … or so. It is possible to get ‘hooked’ on the excitement of getting a tattoo, just as some people get ‘hooked’ on shopping, but that’s not a real addiction. Most people who end up with multiple tattoos do so simply because they like them.

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Piercing

misterinktattoomiamiTips for Navel Piercings

• Wear a hard, vented eye patch (sold at pharmacies) under
tight clothing (like nylon stockings) or use a piece of ace
bandage around your body to keep it in place. Don’t use
tape because it can cause a rash on your skin. This patch can
protect your piercing from from being hit during sports or
other dangers, and reduce irritation from tight clothes.
• Wear clean, comfortable, breathable clothing that protects
your piercing while you are sleeping.
Tips for Ear/Ear Cartilage and Facial Piercings

• Use the t-shirt trick: Dress your pillow in a large, clean t-shirt
and turn it nightly; one clean t-shirt provides four clean
surfaces for sleeping.
• Keep everything super clean that comes near or touches the
pierced area: telephones, headphones, eyeglasses, helmets,
and hats.
• Be careful when styling your hair, and let your stylist know if
you are healing a piercing.

Each body is different and your healing time may be a lot
longer or shorter than your friends’.

How to Clean Your Piercing

• WASH your hands really well before you clean or touch your
piercing for any reason.
• SALINE soak for five minutes once or more per day. Seal a cup
of warm saline solution over the area. For some piercings it will
be easier to use clean gauze or paper towels soaked in saline
solution. Rinse after you salt soak because dried salt crystals
could hurt you and your piercing.
• SOAP only once or twice a day. While showering, lather up a
dime sized drop of the soap to clean the jewelry and the piercing.
Leave the soap on the piercing no more than thirty seconds.
• RINSE to remove all of the soap from the piercing. You do not
have to rotate your jewelry through the piercing.
• DRY gently with clean, disposable paper products. Cloth towels
could snag on jewelry, and they might have bacteria on them.

What To Do

• Wash your hands before you touch the piercing; leave it alone
except when cleaning. During healing, you do not have to to
rotate, turn, or move your jewelry.
• Stay healthy; the healthier your lifestyle, the easier it will be for
your piercing to heal. Get enough sleep and eat a nutritious diet.
Exercise during healing is fine; listen to your body.
• Make sure your sheets and towels are washed and changed
weekly.
• Showers are safer than baths because bathtubs can harbor
germs. Before you get into a bath tub, clean it first, and rinse off
your piercing when you get out.

What Is Normal?

• At first: some bleeding, bruising, swelling, redness, and soreness
or mild pain.
• During healing: some discoloration, itching, oozing of a whitishyellow
fluid (not pus) that will form some crust on the jewelry.
Your skin may tighten around the jewelry as you heal.
• After healing: the jewelry may not move easily in the piercing; do
not force it. If you don’t clean your piercing as a part of your daily
bathing, normal but smelly secretions may build up.
• A piercing may seem just fine before the whole healing process
is done. This is because they heal from the outside in. Even if it
feels fine, the new skin is weak on the inside. Be patient, and
keep cleaning all the way to the end of entire healing period.
• If you have had a piercing for years, it can still shrink or close in
minutes if you take out your jewelry! This is different from person
to person; if you like your piercing, keep jewelry in—do not leave
the hole empty.

What To Avoid

• Avoid cleaning with Betadine®, Hibiclens®, rubbing alcohol,
hydrogen peroxide, and Dial® or other strong soaps, because
these can damage your healing piercing. Also don’t use ointments
because they don’t let your piercing get the air circulation it needs
and may contain ingredients that are not safe for long-term use.
• Avoid Bactine®, pierced ear care solutions, and other products
containing Benzalkonium Chloride (BZK). This can be irritating and
should not be used for long-term care.
• Avoid cleaning too much. This can irritate your piercing and make
it take longer to heal.
• Avoid irritation like friction from clothing, too much motion of the
area, playing with the jewelry, and rough cleaning. These could
make ugly and uncomfortable scar tissue form, and cause other
problems like migration and a longer healing time.
• Avoid rough play, unwashed hands on (or even anywhere near)
your piercing, and contact with others’ bodily fluids like saliva
while you are healing.
• Avoid stress and recreational drug use, including too much
caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol.
• Avoid putting a healing piercing in a lake, pool, hot tub, etc. First,
protect your piercing by using a waterproof bandage (such as
Clean Seals™). You can buy them in any drugstore.
• Avoid all beauty and personal care products on or around the
piercing, including cosmetics, lotions, and sprays, etc.
• Don’t hang charms or any object from your jewelry until the
piercing is fully healed.

Hints and Tips

Jewelry
• Unless there is a problem with the size, style, or material of
your initial jewelry, leave it in for the whole healing period.
If you have an emergency and need to change your jewelry
during healing, visit a qualified piercer for help. (See the APP
website to find APP members, or for a copy of our Picking
your Piercer brochure.)
• Contact your piercer for a non-metallic retainer if your metal
jewelry must be removed (for example, if your doctor or
dentist makes you take it out for a procedure).
• Leave jewelry in at all times. Your piercing can shrink or close
super fast—even if you’ve had it for years. If you take it out,
getting it back in later can be difficult or impossible.
• With clean hands be sure to check threaded ends on your
jewelry for tightness daily. (“Righty-tighty, lefty-loosey.”)
• Carry a clean spare ball in case you lose or break one.
• If you decide you don’t want your piercing any more, simply
remove the jewelry (or have a professional piercer remove
it). Keep cleaning the piercing daily until the hole closes.
Most of the time, only a small mark will be visible.
• If you think you have an infection, leave in quality jewelry
so the infection can drain. If you take the jewelry out, the
surface can close up. That can trap the infection inside the
piercing and cause an abscess. Do not remove jewelry unless
instructed to so by a medical professional.

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